RM Deliverables

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Back to Funded Relationship Management Programme Projects Phase 1: 2009-2010.

Contents


Introduction

This page describes what you need for the final deliverables for the JISC BCE CRM and JISC SLRM Programmes.

The deliverables required from the JISC BCE CRM and SLRM Programmes are identified in the JISC Grant Funding 05/09: Relationship Management (Word format, 522Kb) document. You should read this document again to ensure that you understand what you need to do.

You may also find Section 4 of the JISC Project Management Guidelines (PDF format) and the JISC Project Management Guidelines webpage useful.

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Important Dates

The draft deliverables will be expected one month before the final deliverables. In conjunction with our "critical friends" ("tame experts"), RMSAS and the JISC Programme Managers will be providing feedback and suggestions, which may help you with the submission of your final deliverables.

NOTE: Because of the tight timescales, please note that there will be no extension to the Draft deliverables submission date, except in cases of illness or other emergency, and your Programme Manager must be notified as soon as possible, but there may be a week or so's leeway for the Final deliverables deadline.

Submission of DRAFT Deliverables: By 17:00 on Friday 19th March 2010
Submission of FINAL Deliverables: By 17:00 on Friday 16th April 2010.


DRAFT Deliverables are: Case Study and Final Report.
FINAL Deliverables are: Case Study, Final Report, Completion Report, Budget Report.


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Repositories

"It is intended that the deliverables created as part of this programme, will as appropriate, be deployed by JISC as part of a long-term strategy for providing access to community resources, and where this is possible, arrangements for archiving of delvierables will be set in paly. However, wherever possible projects will be encouraged to set in place mechanisms to ensure the continued availabilty and currency of deliverables after funding has ended..." (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para 43).

"JISC supports unrestricted access to the published output of publicly-funded research and wishes to encourage open access to research outputs to ensure that the fruits of UK research are made more widely available... JISC-funded work should be deposited in an open access institutional repository, or if that isn't available, a subject repository. Deposit should include biographcial metadata relating to such articles, and should be completed within six months of the publication date of the paper" (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para 46).

ACTION: Ensure that your deliverables are available after the project has ended. This may be via your own institutional repository or via the Jorum or other subject repository. Process maps may be stored in the JISC Innovation Base.

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Confidentiality

"...funding is always made available on the condition that project outputs are made available, free at the point of use to UK HE and FE community in perpetuity, and that these may be disseminated widely in partnership with JISC" (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para 44).

NOTE: As the outputs - including the final report, case study and other deliverables - must be made publicly available, you may need to consider whether certain aspects of your findings will impact negatively on your institution. Nevertheless, sensitive issues can be mentioned in a fairly generic way by choosing the appropriate (if slightly woolly!) language. This will still help those who may want to follow in your footsteps. In some respects, the (negative) issues that you've come across in your project are more important than the (positive) successes, because we don't want people to fall into those traps again. But of course, success is always good too!

However, if you feel that there is a confidential issue which you don't feel happy putting in your final report but feel that it is important to be included in the final (anonymous!) synthesis report, please send an e-mail to the RMSAS Project Team or we can discuss it in a 'phone call. You may also choose to mention such issues in the Final Completion Report (which is confidential, between your project and JISC).


Length of Reports

There's no set length for the documents. However, it might help to consider who the audience is and what you're trying to say to them. The Case Study and Final reports will be made public, so the likely audience is someone in HE (or FE) who is interested in finding out more about the Self-Analysis Framework or Service Design and it's application and any issues associated with process improvement for CRM or SLRM. In other words, you want to tell them as much as you can in a length that won't put them off reading Case Studies/Final Reports for life and provide enough detail for them to try it for themselves. Don't forget to mention and issues or possible barriers (unless they're sensitive - see Confidentiality section), as these are as important as the successes.

The Completion (and Budget) Report is confidential and will only be seen by the RMSAS team and JISC. If you have any issues that you feel are too sensitive to put in the public reports but which have had an impact or are important points to consider, then they should go in here. For example, it might be that internal politics have meant that you haven't been able to interview any of your preferred stakeholders and you had to make do with interviewing deputies, who didn't have the full strategic picture. Obviously, you don't want to publicise this information, but it is important for us to know about, particularly if other projects have had the same problems, so this should go in the Completion Report.

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CRM Deliverables

Aim

"Collectively the projects will deliver an enriched corpus of transferable good practice in CRM processes in a range of contexts, for the benefit of the entire sector, building on the CRM Self-analysis Framework good practice developed in BCE CRM Phase 1 work. Individually, the projects will deliver demonstrable and measurable enhancements in CRM process, captured in self-analysis case studies - across a range of institutional contexts as detailed above – which will, together with the parallel Student Lifecycle Relationship Management pilot projects, be fed into the accompanying Support, Analysis and Synthesis project...to synthesise the transferable good practices, benefits and lessons learnt" (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para F7).

'"Each project should pay particular attention to the usage practice and policies around the CRM process or system and how these are to be communicated. Clear strategies on the creation, handling and sharing of data and on data protection will need to be defined/reviewed as part of the process improvement" (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para F33).


You must deliver the following items:

Deliverables from Your Project Plan

"The institution and its partners must supply all deliverables specified in the agreed project proposal. The schedule for submitting deliverables must be included in the Project Plan and agreed with the JISC Executive. Any changes to this schedule must be agreed in writing with the JISC Executive" (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para A3).

NOTE: If you do not think you are going to achieve the deliverables stated in your Project Plan, you must contact Simon Whittemore, CRM Programme Manager as soon as possible.


Case Study

NB: THIS IS THE MAIN DELIVERABLE

"The purpose of the projects funded will be to generate demonstrable process improvement in the institution’s, or institutional collaboration’s, approach to BCE-orientated CRM – including where the CRM process analysed is not institution-wide. Lessons learnt, as highlighted within the resulting case studies, will need to be communicated institution-wide and described in a form that makes them transferable across the sector" (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para F24).


"A case study, written in clear, plain English, intended for the JISC Executive, other institutions and other organisations with an interest in customer/partner relationship management developments and activities, which includes:

a. Concise executive summary highlighting the progress (in terms of CRM process maturity levels) made through the self-analysis, the project partners involved, and the findings and key outputs of the process improvement pilot in the specific institutional context, plus relevant recommendations;
 
  Note: [...Using the process-mapping and associated guidelines in the Self-analysis Framework (especially the ‘Where are You Now’ section), each project should demonstrate how, as a result of undertaking the self-analysis, evidenced attainment of the next level of maturity (as relevant in each case) is to be achieved (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para F21).]
   
b. Brief description of, and rationale for, any methodology adopted in addition to the steps outlined in the CRM Self-Analysis Framework;
 
  Note: May include, for example, how the Self-Analysis Framework was used, any issues with using it and how they were overcome, other methodologies that may have been used in place of the Self-Analysis Framework, etc. Also reasons why you didn't use the Self-Analysis Framework (if that were the case) or whether you used it in a different way than you'd envisaged.
   
c. Section detailing transferable new learning or good practices which enrich and add value to the CRM Self-Analysis Framework, as agreed with the Support, Analysis and Synthesis project; this will be for sector-wide dissemination;
 
  Note 1: [Where there is genuinely added value, new learning, good practices or illuminating case studies or use cases arising from the process improvement projects, the Self-analysis Framework will be enriched and extended by these. Each project is required to identify where in the sequence of the Self-analysis Framework their additions or case studies should be inserted, and how their additions or refinements add value to the Framework. The project should work with the Support, Analysis and Synthesis project to do this (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para F21).]
  Note 2: This work will feed into the RMSAS synthesis work and will help to inform improvements and recommendations for the Self-Analysis Framework.
  Note 3: Include specific transferable good practices related to the Self-Analysis Framework, which enrich and add value to it.
  Note 4: Simon suggests that it would be useful to structure this part of the Case Study around the seven sections of the Self-Analysis Framework, as this will help with the analysis and synthesis of good practice. The key is to identify where the project is able to add value to the Framework, including:
  • Any gaps you feel which need to be addressed;
  • Any inaccuracies or misleading statements you perceive (bearing in mind that there is a diverse sector-wide audience);
  • Any particularly illuminating example to illustrate a part of Framework;
  • Any experiences or practices which, following discussion with other projects and/or with RMSAS, might constitute a new/additional more widely applicable good practice for the sector;
  • Any suggestions about structure, additional features or other aspects, which could enhance the effectiveness and usefulness of the resource for the user.
  Note 5: Additionally (but this is not obligatory), any reflections on a holistic approach to RM which covers both the student lifecycle and the CRM side, which may become a supplementary area of the Framework.
   
d. Clear, readable process maps which illustrate the critical elements of the institution’s BCE CRM processes, its connections with other key institutional functions and processes (including SLRM) and as-is/to-be implications;
 
  Note 1: May include, for example, a selection of process maps and comments.
  Note 2: Process maps may be stored in the JISC Innovation Base.
   
e. The current and potential impact of improved CRM processes on both the key stakeholders within the institution(s) and the organisations and individuals served by them;
 
  Note: Include impact on internal and external stakeholders and any planned progress through the maturity model.
   
f. Brief prioritised list of recommendations to inform future development of JISC work to support institutional BCE CRM." From (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para F46)
 
  Note: Simon clarifies this as either a list or a couple (depending on what project experience has surfaced) of recommendations on where it is felt that JISC should focus its efforts/investment next in CRM/RM (bearing in mind, that this current phase of projects will feed into the next phase (Phase 3) on system features and requirements etc). These recommendations should be at a more strategic level so that JISC can meet the needs of a wide sector and also so that everyone can get the maximum amount of learning from these process improvement pilots.


A copy of the Project Document Cover Sheet may be included with the Case Study.


Blog or Wiki

"A regularly updated blog or wiki (which can be electronically harvestable – through RSS feeds, etc.) to report on project progress and lessons learnt to the JISC Programme Team and Support, Analysis and Synthesis project (in addition to the formal reporting requirements under the terms and conditions of grant)" (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para F46).


Process Approaches

"Process approaches which could enrich domain models in the e-Framework InnovationBase. The JISC Community Engagement Team (CET) will be available to assist projects in modelling any appropriate re-engineered and implemented student lifecycle processes and functions deemed to be of wider applicability to the sector. The CET will harvest these as contributions to the JISC Innovation Base or e-Framework Knowledgebase" (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para F46).


Final Report

"The final report documents what the project has done and achieved. For most projects, it will be a report of publishable quality for the community covering topics like aims and objectives, methodology, achievements, findings, outputs and results, outcomes, conclusions, and implications for future work. Where the completion report simply signs off on the project work, the final report gives a more detailed and considered account of the project’s achievements that will be of interest to stakeholders and peers in the development community. A final report template has been developed as a general guide to the topics that should be covered in final reports. As with all templates, the programme manager will customise it for the programme and indicate what topics to cover" (JISC Project Management Guidelines, para 4.8).

A copy of the Project Document Cover Sheet may be included with the Final Report.


Completion Report and Final Budget Report (Confidential)

"The completion report is a short report for the JISC Executive that acts as a ‘sign-off’ on the project work and captures lessons learned. It’s for internal use within JISC and its purpose is not for publication disclosed to the community. The first part focuses on sign-off issues, e.g. that all deliverables and reports have been submitted and accepted, exit plans have been implemented, and IPR issues have been dealt with. A final budget statement must be included. Any outstanding issues should be listed and when/how they will be resolved. The second part reflects on the project work and lessons learned. For example, does the project feel it has achieved the aims and objectives, and what would they do differently if they could start again. Projects are also asked about any problems they had and lessons learned they would pass on to JISC or other projects. They are encouraged to identify new areas where JISC should undertake development work. This feedback is important so that JISC can improve its current development programmes and develop new ones" (JISC Project Management Guidelines, para 4.7).

There is also a template for the Final Budget Report.

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SLRM Deliverables

Aim

"Projects should examine the different operational processes and use of ICT systems that are employed by FE and HE institutions to support key stages of the Student Lifecycle (see paragraphs G4 to G9) paying particular attention to the interface points between these and placing the student perspective as the focus" (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para G11).

"All projects should explore the integration issues at interface (touch) points between student lifecycle aspects using Service Design approaches (see paragraph G13)" (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para G25).


Aspects to Consider

"Service Design is increasingly used by forward thinking private and public sector organisations as a means of creating the step change their customers require in terms of service experience. Applying the principles of Service Design may be an effective way to examine how to improve the student experience and advance the efficiency of the related administrative processes at the same time. Projects should utilise Service Design theory and practice in order to:

  1. map the overall service infrastructure and its functional components as well as the different processes and systems that support it and their interconnections;
  2. identify the internal and external actors involved in the service dynamic;
  3. identify the actors involved in the definition of the relevant services using appropriate tools;
    Note: Clarification from Myles: Section iii focuses specifically on the learner and meeting their needs while Section vii requires strategic considerations so forward looking and in line with institutional policies and integrated with other corporate initiatives as well as national drivers.
  4. define possible service scenarios, verifying use cases, sequences of actions and actors’ roles, in order to define the requirements of the service and its operational dependencies;
  5. ensure the services examined are informed by consulting students at different stages on the student lifecycle, and taking proper account of their experiences of the services;
  6. create representations of the services, using techniques that illustrate all the components of the service including physical elements, cognitive, perceptive and affective aspects, interactions, logical links and temporal sequences;
  7. pilot the newly designed services for an appropriate time duration (minimum six months) allowing iterative redesign in light of findings;
  8. produce a rich case study." (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para G11).


"Projects should seek to address the following overarching questions:

  1. On communication management and channels of interaction:
    • How can institutions best make use of opportunities?
    • What are the most appropriate channels for individual students?
    • How can communications for students be personalised?
    • Are the solutions technical or human?
  2. On improving the interface between operational and technical processes (where cultural problems and tensions between functional and technical managers may exist):
    • How can this interface be improved?
    • How can functional managers be empowered to take ownership of their processes and data?
    • How can the technical experts be empowered to take a more consultative and proactive role to help functional managers see the possibilities for the technical support and development of their processes?." (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para G11).


You must deliver the following items:

Deliverables from Your Project Plan

"The institution and its partners must supply all deliverables specified in the agreed project proposal. The schedule for submitting deliverables must be included in the Project Plan and agreed with the JISC Executive. Any changes to this schedule must be agreed in writing with the JISC Executive" (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para A3).

NOTE: If you do not think you are going to achieve the deliverables stated in your Project Plan, you must contact Myles Danson, CRM Programme Manager as soon as possible.


Case Study

"A case study, written in clear, plain English, intended for the JISC Executive and other organisations with an interest in student lifecycle management developments and activities, which includes:

  1. An executive summary of the findings of the study and its recommendations;
  2. Description of the methodology adopted;
  3. Relevant artefacts from the service design methods utilised;
  4. Discussion including lessons learned;
  5. Qualified and quantified impact of interventions;
  6. The current and potential impact of student lifecycle management systems on the key stakeholders within the institutions and the individuals served by them;
  7. An appendix containing detailed descriptions of the common processes and interactions which take place at each stage of the student lifecycle;
  8. An appendix listing the individuals and organisations that provided comments and information for the study" (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para G35).
    Note: Clarificaton from Myles: Highlight the overall number, name the key people but include indicative roles/responsibilities - consider the reader who may wish to repeat your work in a different HEI.


A copy of the Project Document Cover Sheet may be included with the Case Study.


Contributions to the Community

"Relevant contributions (both design issues and artefacts) to the JISC Knowledge Base, JISC e-Framework or International e-Framework in collaboration with the JISC Community Engagement Team"' (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para G35).

Process maps may be stored in the JISC Innovation Base.


Blog or Wiki

"A regularly updated blog or wiki (which can be electronically harvestable – through RSS feeds, etc.) to report on project progress and lessons learnt to the JISC Programme Team and Support, Analysis and Synthesis project (in addition to the formal reporting requirements under the terms and conditions of grant)"' (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para G35).


Final Report

"A concise final report summarising the overall experience, addressing the appropriateness of Service Design approaches to the problem areas examined and presenting a scoped and prioritised list of recommendations to JISC for future work"' (JISC Grant Funding 05/09, para G35).

"The final report documents what the project has done and achieved. For most projects, it will be a report of publishable quality for the community covering topics like aims and objectives, methodology, achievements, findings, outputs and results, outcomes, conclusions, and implications for future work. Where the completion report simply signs off on the project work, the final report gives a more detailed and considered account of the project’s achievements that will be of interest to stakeholders and peers in the development community. A final report template has been developed as a general guide to the topics that should be covered in final reports. As with all templates, the programme manager will customise it for the programme and indicate what topics to cover" (JISC Project Management Guidelines, para 4.8).

A copy of the Project Document Cover Sheet may be included with the Final Report.


Completion Report and Final Budget Report (Confidential)

"The completion report is a short report for the JISC Executive that acts as a ‘sign-off’ on the project work and captures lessons learned. It’s for internal use within JISC and its purpose is not for publication disclosed to the community. The first part focuses on sign-off issues, e.g. that all deliverables and reports have been submitted and accepted, exit plans have been implemented, and IPR issues have been dealt with. A final budget statement must be included. Any outstanding issues should be listed and when/how they will be resolved. The second part reflects on the project work and lessons learned. For example, does the project feel it has achieved the aims and objectives, and what would they do differently if they could start again. Projects are also asked about any problems they had and lessons learned they would pass on to JISC or other projects. They are encouraged to identify new areas where JISC should undertake development work. This feedback is important so that JISC can improve its current development programmes and develop new ones" (JISC Project Management Guidelines, para 4.7).

There is also a template for the Final Budget Report.


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